History

Bitterness

AfghanistanI don’t typically consider myself a bitter person. However, I got a massage the other day and as the masseuse was moving over my body we talked about the knots, tight and swollen parts of my body.  I enjoy the process of learning about myself through my body and others’ eyes. The masseuse explained what each painful body part was associated with for emotions. Muscles hold emotions hence physical healing can equate to emotional healing and vice versa. A lot of what she told me were things I already considered and thought about, but bitterness caught me off guard.

My masseuse suggested I start writing down when I can remember being bitter possibly starting with the first time I can remember. My first instinct was to say I’m not bitter. I have made peace with my life and forgiven, but then I started to think. And here I am.

The first times I really remember being bitter is 5th grade. I was probably bitter before then, but can’t recall. I wanted to play on a competition basketball team and the coach had put a team together without me. I don’t know if it was so much bitterness or simply questioning why they wouldn’t pick me to be on the team. I wanted to play. Eventually I did. Eventually I became really good. Eventually I got over it.

The next time I can recall being bitter is in 7th grade when teenage girls were teenage girls. The typical ‘one day we will speak to you, the next we won’t’ or ‘ we are all friends except with her today’ drama. Again I feel like this exclusion caused more hurt than pain. Pain potentially turned to bitterness. I am friends with many of those same girls and I don’t think this really caused any bitterness or animosity.

Maybe the first time I felt turn bitterness is 8th grade when I kissed a boy for a dollar on the bus. He was pronounced amazing and a stud. I got called a dollar-whore. The double standard of men and women’s roles in society had never been so real or prevalent until that kiss. This is when I learned there is no such thing as equality. I am bitter over this.

The next thing I remember being bitter about is when my best friend convinced me to dump the boy I had been in love with for years. Because she didn’t like him. The next week they were dating. I’m also bitter my first true sexual experience. I was used and discarded by the group of guys I had been really good friends with for years. I was the girl in the group and not one of the guys like I thought.

I remember walking with Amber to meet a guy and some friends during the summer. I looked at her and said please don’t leave me alone with this guy. We had met him the day prior and he scared me. She left me with him within minutes of meeting up with everyone. He took advantage of the situation and raped me. I’m not bitter over the rape. I am bitter over the fact  I asked my friend to stay with me and she abandoned me without any thought or hesitation.

I was bitter as a freshman basketball player when I rarely got to play Varsity. I thought I was better than some of the Varsity girls and I wanted to play.

I remember being bitter that I never fit in with the girls I played ball with. I was never pretty enough, feminine enough, I was never the “it” girl. I wasn’t the girl the boys were interested in.

Being bitter over never getting the recognition I deserved for sports. Always being the person in the background.

I was bitter over how the guys in college treated me. I was never their equal and they would create drama for fun between the girls. I remember putting in hard work and being shit on for it. Come to find out later the guys got away with things by doing the professor’s papers for graduate school.

I am bitter my husband used me. He manipulated the situation and treated me like a bank roll rather than someone important. I always worked harder and did more to help us. I am bitter he died by suicide.

I am bitter that my in-laws got his life insurance and left me with all his/our debt and the cost of his funeral. I am bitter his family treated me like shit and then his grandparents went on a mission. They had the audacity to do his temple work without informing me or getting my permission. I am bitter I am held accountable for his actions. I am bitter I am damaged because of him, I am hurt and cautious.

I am bitter I never meet guys who are interested in me that are what I want. I am tired of being treated like I’m unvalued and unimportant. I am tired of being a peice of ass that hasn’t been loved. I am bitter I have loved endlessly while not being loved back. I am bitter I can give so much of myself to others and receive nothing in return.

I am bitter I have to fight for common sense. That stupid people are allowed to take command and make poor decision without repercussion. I am bitter I am punished for having values and morals.

I am bitter I have to wait patiently and feel incomplete, unwhole.

I am bitter.

Taboo, let’s talk about it…

TabooThe word taboo originates from Polynesian culture. Captain James Cook introduced it into the English language after his voyage to Tonga in 1771. It’s use has been widespread ever since.


The online merriam-webster dictionary defines taboo (also spelled tabu) as an adjective, meaning not acceptable to talk about or do.


The Britannica Encyclopaedia states taboo, or tabu, is the prohibition of an action based on the belief that such behaviour is either too sacred and consecrated or too dangerous and accursed for ordinary individuals to undertake.


Sigmund Freud defined taboo as ambivalent social attitude and in effect represents forbidden actions for which there nevertheless exist a strong unconscious inclination.


As I spend time researching taboo I have come to the conclusion that taboo is defined as forbidden to talk about or do. However, what is forbidden differs in every culture and the reason for being forbidden varies based on each society and its history. Societal norms come from years of tradition and change over time through wars, revolutions, science, religion, and many other evolutionary events. Even over time, some universal viewpoints remain taboo.


These topics are avoided to “protect” the community and individuals. In this avoidance we make a mistake. We make the assumption that if we don’t acknowledge it, it doesn’t exist and won’t happen (e.g. failure, divorce, rape, suicide) or it will only happen when it is appropriate (e.g. feelings, sex, pregnancy, death). When it does happen, especially unplanned, no one knows how to properly respond. People are too embarrassed, ashamed, upset, stunned, and/or confused to discuss topics appropriately, inevitably making situations worse.


One of the keys to freedom and liberation is knowledge. Societal norms dictate taboo topics, forcing censorship upon the individuals within said society. The only way to overcome this is to discuss the uncomfortable and open your mind to possibilities (disclaimer: this does not mean do illegal things). We must take the time to appropriately address and discuss what is forbidden; must overcome the fear and stress that comes with discussing the uncomfortable, the forbidden. We cannot hide behind the facade of ignorance is bliss; we must engage the taboo to truly protect.